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Taking Back our Community

On September 6, 2017 the Redding City Council approved implementation of a program called Taking Back our Community – NOT to be confused with the rogue Facebook Page Take Back Redding/Shasta County – Stop Talking, Start Doing.

By way of background, “during the past several years changes to state law in the form of Assembly Bill (AB) 109, Proposition 47 and Proposition 57, have made fundamental alterations to the fabric of California’s criminal justice system. Many of those changes have been overdue and necessary, as not all crimes should be punished with jail sentences.

California cities, counties and the state are facing increased crime which endangers the health and safety of residents, business owners, police officers, and property. This is in large part a result of some of these legislative changes, which have created a situation where violent and career criminals are serving little to no prison time.

The California Police Chiefs Association (CPCA) is recommending implementation of a program called “Taking Back our Community.”

Taking Back our Community is a three-point process:

  1. Explain what is happening in our community when it comes to public safety. While every community will have a slightly different set of facts, for Redding, property-related crimes have spiked. These include shoplifting, minor larceny, auto burglaries, and others.
  2. Post a pamphlet on the Redding Police Department (RPD) website that can be disseminated to the community explaining this complex topic of how AB109, Proposition 47, and Proposition 57 have contributed greatly to the rising crime stats.
  3. Finally, suggest what a resident can do in the form of writing letters to the legislators and the governor demanding action.”

Here’s their factsheet:


THE NEW CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM IN CALIFORNIA

AB 109 / PROPOSITION 47 / PROPOSITION 57 FACT SHEET

AB 109

AB 109 transferred nearly 45,000 felons from the State prison system to local jail facilities. However, it is important to note that local jails were not designed to house criminals on a long-term basis. Rather, facilities built in local jurisdictions were intended to detain individuals on a short-term basis for minor or while awaiting trial.

The approval of AB 109 has resulted in the ongoing transference of criminals that should be serving State prison sentences for felony convictions back to local jail facilities. However, local jail facilities were never designed to house violent criminals for extended periods of time, and were already overcrowded before AB 109 was approved. Given the need for local jurisdictions to now house violent felons, AB 109 has resulted in the release of tens of thousands of lower-level convicted criminals back into our community.

Ultimately, as a result of AB 109, while the State prison population has decreased, local jail facilities have seen an increase in the number inmates being incarcerated, resulting in lower-level criminals being released early. This has had a direct impact on rising property crime rates throughout the State.

 

PROP 47

Proposition 47, called The Safe Neighborhoods and Schools Act, was approved by 60% of California voters in 2014. However, instead of keeping our neighborhoods and schools safe, approval of Proposition 47 actually served to reclassify and downgrade a number of serious crimes from felonies to misdemeanors.

Drug possession, repeated shoplifting, forging checks, and possession of date-rape drugs – all of

The effects of Proposition 47 have been far reaching. Today, a criminal can steal as much and as many times as they like, and so long as the value of what is stolen during each theft is less than $950, the violation is considered a misdemeanor. In addition, the possession of any illegal drug – including cocaine, heroin, and ability to compel addicts to enter drug rehabilitation programs.

POSSESSION OF DRUGS = MISDEMEANOR

  • Possession of Methamphetamine
  • Possession of Cocaine
  • Possession of Heroin
  • Possession of other opiates

STEAL $950 OR LESS = MISDEMEANOR 

  • Theft / Theft With A Prior
  • Shoplifting
  • Forgery / Fraud / Bad Checks
  • Receiving Stolen Property

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A MISDEMEANOR AND A FELONY?

MISDEMEANOR 

  • Misdemeanors are minor violations that must generally occur in the officer’s presence in order for an arrest to be made.
  • Penalty is up to one year in jail, but most often results in probation with no jail time.
  • Criminals arrested for misdemeanor crime violations are typically released immediately with a citation to appear in court at a later date.

FELONY

  • Felonies are the most serious kind of crime.
  • Penalty used to be jail time in State prison for more than one year.
  • Today, because of AB 109, some criminals with serious felony violations serve time in local jail facilities.

PROP 47 REDUCED ACCOUNTABILITY FOR THOSE WHO COMMIT CRIME.

 

PROP 57

Proposition 57, called The Public Safety and Rehabilitation Act, was approved by 65% of California voters in the early release of up to 30,000 criminals convicted of “non-violent” felonies. Among the crimes that are

  • Rape by intoxication
  • Rape of an unconscious person
  • Drive-by shooting
  • Assault with a deadly weapon
  • Hate crime causing physical injury
  • Corporal injury to a child

Other adverse public safety impacts that were authorized by Prop 57 are:

  • The State Department of Corrections has been given the unlimited authority to grant credits to all criminals – regardless of the nature of their crime – which would facilitate any criminal’s early release from State prison.
  • Criminals who commit multiple crimes against multiple victims will be eligible for release at the same time as offenders who only committed a single crime against a single victim.
  • Repeat criminals will be eligible for release after the same period of incarceration as first time offenders.

 

 

CONTACT YOUR STATE LEGISLATOR TODAY

AND ASK FOR HELP TO

TAKE BACK OUR COMMUNITY

Our State legislators are the individuals who can make the changes necessary to help protect our communities, and we need you to contact them to ask that they help us take back our community!

Visit the City’s website to find additional facts about AB 109 / Prop 47 / Prop 57, advocacy letter templates,, and additional information on the City’s Take Back Our Community campaign. Then, contact our State legislators and ask them to make the criminal justice system changes needed to ensure that violent and career criminals are kept out of our communities.

  • Governor Jerry Brown, State Capitol, Suite 1173 Sacramento, CA 95814
  • Assembly Member Brian Dahle, Capitol Office, Room 4098 Sacramento, CA 94249 Phone: (916) 319-2001
  • Senator Ted Gaines, State Capitol, Room 3076 Sacramento, CA 95814 Phone: (916) 651-4001 Fax: (916) 651-4901

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